The Quiltmaking Process

Yes, I realize this is NOT my K-Lee’s Kreations blog–but since I’m still working on updating that blog and K-Lee’s Kreations is my other business…I’m cross-posting. 😉

 

Me, K. Lee, working on a quilt
Me, K. Lee, working on a quilt.

 

The suggestion for Day 13 of the Ultimate Blog Challenge is this idea:

Day 13: Process

Every niche or market has its own process.

What process do you do differently

that you can share with your readers?

 

Well, I’ve already discussed my process of “kreating” my imprinted photos, so this time, I thought I’d briefly discuss and show with pictures the process of how pieces of fabric end up as a completed quilt.

My Quiltmaking Process

First, I choose (or a customer chooses) a quilt design. For the purposes of this post, the design is called Trip Around the World, featuring a radiating  pattern from the center of the quilt.

 

Trip Around the World Quilt I made for a customer.
Trip Around the World Quilt I made for a customer.

 

Next, based on colors chosen, I purchase fabric (or check my fabric stash) and prepare to cut them into 4 1/2- or 5 1/2-inch strips across the width of the fabric (depending on the size of the quilt).

 

My quilt fabric.
My quilt fabric.

 

Then, if I use imprinted photos (as in this case), I decide on placement (or the customer lets me know).

 

Imprinted photos for this quilt.
Imprinted photos for this quilt.

 

Then I cut each fabric strip into the number of squares I need.

 

Cutting fabric into squares.
Cutting fabric into squares.

 

Then I stack them up by color.

 

My stack of squares.
My stack of squares.

 

Next, I arrange them into the Trip Around the World pattern.

 

I arrange the fabric and imprinted photos.
I arrange the fabric and imprinted photos.

 

Then I stack them up by rows and bring them to my sewing machine.

 

My stacked quilt squares.
My stacked quilt squares.

 

After I sew the squares together into rows, I press all the seams, then sew the rows into a quilt top and add the border. Then after measuring the top, I calculate the number of squares I’ll need for the backing and repeat the process I used for making the quilt top.

 

Backing for my quilt.
Backing for my quilt.

 

Finally, I layer the backing wrong side up, the batting, and then the quilt top right side up. I pin all the layers, then hand-tie it using a curved needle and Perle floss. My hubby often helps me do this part, because I’ve developed bone spurs in my arthritic right thumb.  🙁

Hand tying my quilt.
Hand tying my quilt.

 

Finally, I wrap the backing around to the front, pin it down to form the binding, and sew around the outer edges to catch in the binding.

 

This is a collage showing some of the steps in the quiltmaking process.

Collage showing some of the steps in the process.
Collage showing some of the steps in the process.

 

Flynn Quilting System

So that’s my standard quiltmaking process, for now, at least. I’m hoping to get my quilting system set up and start using that to finish quilts, instead of hand tying them. This is the system I have, from John Flynn. If you’re interested, check out his video where he shows how to use it (or just skim through it if you want to catch the main idea).

 

 

Questions for YOU, Dear Reader

If you don’t quilt, were you aware of all these steps? If you do quilt, is this similar to your quiltmaking process?

 

6 thoughts on “The Quiltmaking Process

  1. I love the idea of sewing and quilting, but after being introduce to the craft by a perfectionist who insisted on making me rip out every seam that wasn’t perfect, I have no desire to try. My daughter asked for a machine, and received, for Christmas, however, and my husband has been showing her how to use it.

    I just can’t move past perfect.
    Carrie Ann Tripp (@CarrieAnnTripp) recently posted..This Giant Light of Mine

  2. K Lee:
    Here again, this time from the UBC! I think what I love most about quilts are the colors and the warmth and the time spent on all the squares. my brother had an Amish wedding ring quilt for years and years until it finally wore out from use. He loved it! Best of luck with all your creations!
    Amy
    Amy Bovaird recently posted..Top 5 Things I Bump Into

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