Preventing Procrastination: Removing the Barriers and Lack of Self-Control

Today’s post in the “Preventing Procrastination, Prizing Prioritizing, and Pursuing Purpose” series I introduced in yesterday’s post is on how procrastination is a barrier and indicates a lack of self-control.

It’s really humbling to look back over decades of my life (yes, DECADES – I’m 58!) and see how procrastination has unfortunately been a constant companion. I am more determined than ever to overcome and pull down this stronghold to make the latter half of my life more victorious than the first half.

 

 

Procrastination tends to be the enemy of precision, of establishing a schedule with specific tasks at designated times and on set days–not “someday” or”whenever.”

 

These are areas I can identify as barriers and struggles in my own life; perhaps they are yours as well:

 

Scheduling and meeting deadlines: Procrastination can be a barrier to getting things done on a timely basis.  If we keep the “I’ll get to it whenever” mentality, we typically end up being late or missing a deadline altogether. If we don’t write something down and schedule it in as soon as we know about it, we can likewise forget about something important until it’s too late to take care of it.

 

Striving for better health:  Procrastination can be a barrier to better health. The longer we put off changing our lifestyles by eating better, exercising, and cutting out bad, unhealthy habits, the more chance there is that we will open the door to weight gain and health problems related to being overweight and not eating properly. The longer we put off making changes, the more weight we will gain; the longer it will take to lose the excess pounds, and the more strain we put on our bodies.

 

Building better relationships:  Procrastination can be a barrier to better relationships. If we put off or neglect to address issues that exist in our relationships with others–spouses, significant others, children, parents, siblings, friends, co-workers, colleagues–what may be a little thing that could be easily addressed at the time, can morph into a huge problem that threatens to damage or destroy the relationship.

 

Maintaining peace of mind:  Procrastination can be a barrier to gaining and maintaining peace of mind. For example, every time we put off doing something we know we should do, the more that task and its impending deadline torment us and cause anxiety, frustration, and even physical illness.

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On the subject of procrastination indicating a lack of self-control, to paraphrase one of Joyce Meyer’s quotes, it takes self-control to DO as well as NOT to  do something. It’s our choice about whether or not to acknowledge and confront those areas of our lives where we lack in self-control.

 

In other words, we can choose to exercise self-control to prevent and overcome procrastination…or not!

 

 

I offer examples of my own areas of weakness in order to help anyone reading or interested in following this series. I’ve realized I *MUST* confront these areas of my life if I’m ever going to have complete victory.

 

These are areas I can admit, to my shame, that represent struggles with self-control related to procrastination, such as:

 

*Not managing my time well and missing deadlines, or not getting enough sleep because I’ve left too much to do in too little time.

 

*Over-committing to do something, or getting wrapped up in big plans or projects, without completely thinking through the process and demands.

 

*Intending to eat better, but not always planning ahead soon enough and settling for something less nutritious–or skipping a meal completely.

 

*Intending to do a full workout, but lingering too long reading or socializing on Facebook, which cuts into that time and I end up doing an abbreviated workout, or none at all.

“Nothing is so fatiguing as

the eternal hanging on of an uncompleted task.”

~William James

 

So what about you, if you dare to share?

 

Do you agree that procrastination is a barrier?

 

In what ways do you identify procrastination as a barrier in your life?

 

What areas of life tend to trip up your ability to exercise self-control to either do the right thing or to not do the wrong thing?

 

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19 thoughts on “Preventing Procrastination: Removing the Barriers and Lack of Self-Control

  1. I’m terrible when it comes to procrastination. I do agree that procrastination is a barrier. When it comes to meeting deadlines, scheduling has helped me overcome the barrier of procrastination.

  2. Procrastination is a difficult enemy especially if you can’t seem to motivate yourself to do work. I think the suggestions you have here are definitely helpful!

  3. I generally don’t have problems with procrastination, until I get really overwhelmed. Then I get into a “I have so much to do that I can’t get anything done” mode. These are such great tips.

  4. I never have had a big problem with procrastinating–maybe putting things off–things I really did not want to do-but always managed to get them done on a timely basis. I am a decade older then you–and now that I am semi retired–well–I just don’t plan anything that has a definite time–life is so much more pleasant!

  5. Sometimes, I wonder why I procrastinate. Until I realized that procrastination is a product of a way of thinking. For me, it’s that thinking that there will only be tomorrow to worry about work-to-be-done. One technique I used to drive myself to get up and finish a chore or project is to “monetizing” in my mind the lost time. The exercise gives context to the amount of time I am wasting away doing nothing.

  6. i’m a huge procrastinator and i’ve just been trying to stick to lists and completing them. I’m good most of the time but, it takes work to break bad habits. will try your suggestions. anything helps.

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